A Step by Step Guide to Making a Felt Cloche Hat

A helpful post for Felt Cloche Hat Making

thestitchsharer

Felt cloche with side swept brimStep 1: Select the blocks you are going to use to shape the fabric and cover them in plastic. Make up a water-based stiffening solution (8:1 for felt). Soak the felt hood in this stiffening solution.

Step 2: Stretch the felt hood and pull the base of the hood over the brim block. Pin the hood roughly in place (North, South, East, West) to hold in place.

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Millinery Flower Headpiece with Worbla Black Art

Worbla Black Art Thermoplastic Millinery FlowerWould you like to see my latest thermoplastic experiment with Worbla’s Black Art?

Worbla Black Art, like Worbla mesh art and finest art becomes flexible at around 90 degrees Celsius, but has a much smoother finish. I’d previously seen a great article by a cosplayer on the Worbla website on how to make leaves using a silicon cake flower mould. I totally loved this idea (especially as I’m not great artist) and started to play. Continue reading

A Step by Step Guide to making a Sinamay Hat with an up turned brim

Where it started!

thestitchsharer

sinamay hat from frontI have recently been to London to learn about traditional Millinery techniques from the great Rose Cory. Rose is often referred to as the “Milliners Milliner” and during her forty year career and has made fabulous hats for many celebrities including the late Queen Mum.

I’m writing this post as a personal record / memory jogger of how I made my Sinamay Hat under Rose’s guidance. What has become apparent over the last few months is that there is no right or wrong way to make a hat, every millinery has their own preference, tips and techniques. If you have any of your own, please send me your comment – I would love to know.

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Making a Pillbox Hat Using Worbla Mesh Art

Worbla Meshed Art with Heat GubI’m very excited to be writing my first blog post about experimenting with Worbla Mesh ArtWorbla’s Mesh Art is a thermoplastic which when heated  to 90 degrees Celsius becomes flexible (and tacky) so it can be easily moulded – it’s often used to create amazing Cosplay costumes. Worbla Mesh Art is smooth and shiny on the ‘right’ side (shown in the photo) and reinforced with a flexible mesh on the other side to makes it less easy to tear.

This post is about my first experience of using a thermoplastic product (and a heat gun!), many thanks to Cast4Art for the sample.  I must admit I was pretty nervous about working with this new product, I looked at the sheet for days before summoning up the courage to have a go. There are probably lots of different (and better) ways of working with this product that I’ve yet to find out about – I would love to hear about your thermoplastic experience. For any ‘wanna be’ Worbla users, I would recommend checking out the tutorials and how to guides on the Worbla website before you get started. Continue reading